What is Motor Neurone Disease ?

Motor Neuron Disease is also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease.

" I don't have much positive to say about motor neuron disease, but it taught me not to pity myself because others are worse off, and to get with what I still could do. I'm happier now than before I developed the condition."

Stephen Hawking

MDN describes a group of diseases affecting the nerves in the brain and spinal cord that  tell you muscles what to do. With MND, messages from these nerves gradually stop reaching the muscles, leading them to weaken, stiffen and waste.

MND affects everyone differently. It can affect how you walk, talk, drink and breathe. Some people also experience changes to their thinking behaviour. Symptoms progress at different speeds, which makes the progress of these diseases difficult to predict.

It's always fatal and can significantly shorten life expectancy, but some people live with it for many years. There is no cure, but there are treatments to help reduce the impact it has on your daily life.

 

To learn more about MND

Watch this short animated film

There is one in 300 risk of getting MND in your life; it can affect adults of any age but is more likely to affect those over 50. MND affects up to 5,000 adults in the UK at any one time.

In most cases, there is no apparent family history of the disease. In these instances, it is thought a number  of genetic and environmental factors need to combine before MND can develop.

Where a family history of MND exists, it is caused by a genetic mistake that is passed down. However other triggers may still be needed for the disease to begin.

Motor Neuron Disease Association

Go to their website

MDN describes a group of diseases affecting the nerves in the brain and spinal cord that  tell you muscles what to do. With MND, messages from these nerves gradually stop reaching the muscles, leading them to weaken, stiffen and waste.

MND affects everyone differently. It can affect how you walk, talk, drink and breathe. Some people also experience changes to their thinking behaviour. Symptoms progress at different speeds, which makes the progress of these diseases difficult to predict.

It's always fatal and can significantly shorten life expectancy, but some people live with it for many years. There is no cure, but there are treatments to help reduce the impact it has on your daily life.

There is one in 300 risk of getting MND in your life; it can affect adults of any age but is more likely to affect those over 50. MND affects up to 5,000 adults in the UK at any one time.

In most cases, there is no apparent family history of the disease. In these instances, it is thought a number  of genetic and environmental factors need to combine before MND can develop.

Where a family history of MND exists, it is caused by a genetic mistake that is passed down. However other triggers may still be needed for the disease to begin.